The girl who makes us laugh out loud

Very Funny: Comedian Sarah Gaul will play three shows in Newcastle this week. Five years ago, Sarah Gaul opened the newspaper to read her first gig review.
Nanjing Night Net

She was labelled a “comedienne”.

This came as a shock because she thought she was a “comedian” – like everyone else who goes onstage to make people laugh.

As such, the title of her latestshow isComedienne.

The show celebrates and dissects the “joys and struggles of being a sentient human woman in 2017”, through song and storytelling.

Sarah, 26, will perform the show for three nights this week from Thursday to Saturday at the Royal Exchange theatre in Newcastle (her hometown).

It’s been billed as a “laugh-out-loud hour of musical comedy from one of Australia’s most promising up-and-coming talents”.

Her style has been described as beinglike the social satire of Tim Minchin.

A Sarah Gaul track, titled The Vegan Song.One of her songs, for example, is about fairytales and young girls.

“It’s about how they teach them that their job is to be pretty and find a prince,” she said, wryly.

Another song is about how “a lot of people my age are starting to have kids”.

She asks the self-mocking question, “if I had a daughter, what would I do with it”.

“Upload pictures of it to the internet,” she quipped, adding with a deep belly laugh: “I’ve blocked so many people on Facebook because they only upload pictures of their kids”.

She’s also had a long-running joke about men and their “party shirts”. She’s referring to the ones with “short sleeves, a collar and really loud patterns”.

“They’re like Hawaiian shirts, but formal. They’re the ones that every guy wears out.”

Here she is channelling the inner thoughts ofparty-shirtmen everywhere:“I’m wearing my good shirt out. I’m gonna get the ladies tonight”.

We’re not sure they would get the ladies with those type of shirts, we suggested.

“They’d give it a go,” she countered.

She has another song about “the weird things that go through your head” when you’re home alone at night.

“You try on clothes and look at weird stuff on the internet, you convince yourself that you’re dying. It’s like ‘oh my god I’ve got a headache – it must be a brain tumour’.”

Committed to MemorySarah has been playing piano and singing since she was eight. She started writing songs when she was 21, thinking she’dbe like Delta Goodrem, get a record deal and become famous.

“What kept coming out was comedy,” she said.

She loved writing comedy songs, so she stuck to it.

“Now I have a huge repertoire of songs and I’m constantly writing,” she said.

The songwriting process fascinates us. How does Sarah do it?

“I write by ear. There’s no logical process to how I write. It’s not a formula,” she said.

“Usually I’ll write a song from start to finish in 10 minutes. Then I’ll work on it for a couple of months until it’s exactly how I want it.”

Is the song then burnt into her memory forever?

“Yep, it’s all in my head,” she said.

“In Newcastle, I’ll play an hour and a half show from memory.”

She rehearses songs, soshe doesn’tneed to check lyrics before she plays.

But she never writes the music down. She remembers dozens and dozens of songs. Mind you, she does admit she doesn’t remember names very well. That’s fair enough. Humans only have so much brain power.

Sarah isdonatingmoney from ticket sales and askingfor donations for Jenny’s Place, a Newcastle-based refuge for women and children escaping domestic violence.

As for the shows, Sarah said “they tend to sell out because my [Newcastle-based] parents hustle like nothing else, so make sure you jump online and grab your tix before the night”.

Tickets are available through facebook南京夜网/sarahthegaul.